Blog post 5: Technobiophilia

Technobiophilia is the love of biological or lifelike functions in technology. I express this by having nature themed wallpapers on my computer desktop. It has also shown in my teammates for class. When we were first creating our websites and were picking the theme, we kept oohing and ahhing at the nature themes. I can relate to Sue Thomas’s talk about technobiophilia. Just like the people she talks about, I like computers and programming, but I also like camping and being outdoors. The connection is made between nature and technology with all the terms we use to describe things. Cloud storage, for example, is a way to store data outside of our computers. Another example is the term filter bubble. Technobiophilia could also be expressed through digital storytelling.

 

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Blog post 4 – Digital Storytelling MOOC Talk

In the MOOC Talk with Bryan Alexander and Nicola Allain, the topic of digital storytelling was discussed. There are many different ways to digitally tell stories in the modern day, thanks to the internet and computers. One method I related with the most was one that Bryan talked about, video games. I like to play video games, and I have since I was very young. One of my favorite parts of a game is the story.  I think video games allow stories to be told in such a way that the player feels like they are a part of it. Nicola talked about her digital storytelling classes and how they related to metaliteracy. That connects to our class since we are talking about digital storytelling and metaliteracy as well. Another way the mooc talk connects to class is that we watched it in class. I think it was cool that we could watch not only the video but also the chat. Some other methods of digital storytelling from other assignments are using social media as well as making websites devoted to a story, like the story about the abandoned mining village.One way I use digital storytelling is by making updates to facebook or twitter. This is just like making a digital story of my life.

 

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Blog 3: Digital Storytelling

In the old days, stories used to be passed down from generation to generation by people called story tellers. For these people, telling the stories of the past was their life’s work. Verbal communication used to be the only way for stories to be passed down. In the modern day, there are many outlets for people to use to tell stories. The internet is full of places for people to tell stories, be it youtube, twitter, facebook, or their own website. Specifically, there is a twitter account dedicated to tweeting facts about the revolutionary war. When I saw that I thought of 5th grade. We had a day where there was a reenactment of a battle in the back field of our school. All of us dressed up in clothes from that era and learned all about it. Another example of digital storytelling is Joe Mcdonald on Facebook. This page is updated as a student in the year 1914. Another example of digital storytelling is through online articles, some of which can be found in online databases. Also, a more trustworthy source of stories could be an academic journal, also accessible in online databases. Credibility is important as there have been cases where people have told stories which aren’t true. One such case is when somebody tweeted that the New York Stock Exchange got flooded from Hurricane Sandy. This story, although untrue, was picked up by the weather channel as well as CNN and reported. 

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Blog Post 2 Media and News Literacy

In the new age of social media, the way people get news is evolving. This is both good and bad. One benefit to social media is that news can be transmitted much more rapidly. With things like twitter and Facebook, people can find out news almost instantly. This isn’t always a good thing however, as not all of the news is reliable. This was shown when CNN News reported that the New York Stock Exchange was flooded due to Hurricane Sandy. The story turned out to be false, pulled off of twitter and repeated as breaking news. Another benefit of social media is that different types of news and information can be viewed. Commander Chris Hadfield of the International Space station used Youtube to demonstrate how different things are done in space. Normally the average person would have no clue how things work in space, but thanks to the availability of an internet connection and a camera, Hadfield could be a space reporter. The ability for all people to create news isn’t always good though, as the news may not be trustworthy or legitimate. It has also been said that the nature of information in the modern era is such that people are constantly bombarded with new facts and develop short attention spans as a result, often glued to their phones. One way to combat this new side effect could be having people get some information from different sources, such as scholarly journals and periodicals as seen in class.

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What metaliteracy means to me

Metaliteracy to me is a central connection between all information. It deals with all forms of information, as well as the process behind creating new information. The forms of information range from books to websites and are ever growing. What I hope to get out of this class is the ability to do research in a better way. I find myself looking up the answers to questions online, but I think this class will teach me new ways of finding information. This will help me throughout my college career for sure. Another thing I’d like to learn is how to properly cite sources. This is another thing which will help immensely in college. If I don’t have to look up how to write a citation every time I need to write one I can save valuable time when writing papers. Two of the topics from the MOOC which interest me are “Media and News Literacy” and “Digital Storytelling and Metaliteracy.” 

 

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